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Maple Pear Jelly – Light jelly with rich caramel notes Home Steading

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The maple syrup adds delicate caramel notes to this easy maple pear jelly recipe. Just half a cup of maple syrup will sweeten the entire batch.

Maple pear jelly

We make a lot of canned and canned food here on the homestead. We grow some things ourselves, we buy others on site and others trade with neighbors.

Our pear tree is still small, but our neighbors have a beautiful tree that is over 50 years old. Every year my sons and I go over and help harvest some of the pears.

There was a bump fruit this year, so we’re trying out a few new recipes, including this maple pear jelly and the pear ginger jam.

If you don’t have a neighbor with a pear tree, check out your local farmers market or grocery store. You can often get a good deal of business with seasonal mass products.

Maple pear jelly recipe

Pear jam and jelly are good, but I like to experiment with different flavors every year.

This recipe makes a firm jelly. So if you prefer a softer spread, reduce the calcium water to 3 teaspoons and the pectin to 4 teaspoons.

ingredients

  • 4 pounds of ripe pears
  • 1 3/4 cup of water
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 4 teaspoons of calcium water
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 5 teaspoons of Pomonas pectin powder

manual

  1. Prepare your jars, lids, and rings. Fill the water bath scanner with water and heat it up. Sterilize your jars.
  2. Core and chop the pears. Combine chopped pears in a large sauce pan with 1 3/4 cup water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat and simmer covered for 7 to 15 minutes, until pears are tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and mash pears.
  3. Place pear puree in a jelly bag or flour sack towel. Hang the bag or towel over a bowel and let the juice drip until you have 4 cups of juice. Discard the pulp or keep it for another use.
  4. Put four cups of juice in a large saucepan with lemon juice and calcium water. Mix to combine.
  5. In a medium bowl, combine maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.
  6. Bring fruit juice mixture to a boil over medium heat. Add the maple syrup and pectin mixture, stirring constantly, until the sugar has completely dissolved. Bring the jelly to a boil for a minute. Take off the stove.
  7. Scoop jelly into sterilized jars, leaving a 1/4-inch clearance. Wipe the rims with a damp cloth. Put on cover and ring, tighten hand-tight.
  8. Lower the jars into the scanner and make sure they are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Put the lid on the scanner and return to the boil. Process glasses for 10 minutes.
  9. Turn off the heating. Take the glasses out of the scanner and place them on a kitchen towel on the countertop. Let cool down for 8 – 24 hours.
  10. Check seals. Remove rings, date, label, and store your maple pear jelly in a cool, dry place.

This recipe is adapted from Preserve with Pomonas pectin.

Height adjustments for Maple Pear Jelly (and other water bath canned foods)

Adjust the boiling water boiling time as listed below if you are taking a boiling water bath at an elevation greater than 1000 feet above sea level.

Height feet Increase processing time

  • 1,001 – 3,000 5 minutes
  • 3,001-6,000 10 minutes
  • 6,001-8,000 15 minutes
  • 8,001-10,000 20 minutes

Adapted to fresh preservation – adjustments to the cans at great heights.

What is calcium water?

Calcium water is made from water and the calcium powder found in every box of Pomonas Universal Pectin. ((Get Pomonas Pectin here.)

One box of Pomonas pectin makes several batches of jam or jelly. You can also use it to make jello. It gels with little or no sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Each box of Pomonas Universal Pectin contains 2 packets:

To make the calcium water, simply mix half a teaspoon of calcium powder with half a cup of water. I mix mine in a one-cup mason jar.

Store the calcium water in the refrigerator between uses. It takes several months. Discard the calcium water if it changes color or you see mold.

Print friendly recipe

Use the recipe card below to print a copy of the recipe. It’s okay to double the recipe when using Pomonas pectin.

To press

Maple pear jelly

Maple pear jelly

The maple syrup adds delicate caramel notes to this easy maple pear jelly recipe. Just half a cup of maple syrup will sweeten the entire batch.

  • Author: Laurie Neverman
  • Preparation time: 1 hour
  • Cooking time: 20 minutes
  • Total time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 4 cups 1x
  • Category: jelly
  • Method: canned goods
frame

ingredients

  • 4th Pound of ripe pears
  • 1 3/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup Lemon juice
  • 4 teaspoonss calcium water
  • 1/2 cup Maple syrup
  • 5 teaspoonss Pomonas pectin powder

manual

  1. Prepare your jars, lids, and rings. Fill the water bath scanner with water and heat it up. Sterilize your jars.
  2. Core and chop the pears. Combine chopped pears in a large sauce pan with 1 3/4 cup water. Bring to a boil over high heat, reduce heat and simmer covered for 7 to 15 minutes, until pears are tender, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and mash pears.
  3. Place pear puree in a jelly bag or flour sack towel. Hang the bag or towel over a bowel and let the juice drip until you have 4 cups of juice. Discard the pulp or keep it for another use.
  4. Put four cups of juice in a large saucepan with lemon juice and calcium water. Mix to combine.
  5. In a medium bowl, combine maple syrup and pectin powder. Mix thoroughly and set aside.
  6. Bring fruit juice mixture to a boil over medium heat. Add the maple syrup and pectin mixture, stirring constantly, until the sugar has completely dissolved. Bring the jelly to a boil for a minute. Take off the stove.
  7. Scoop jelly into sterilized jars, leaving a 1/4-inch clearance. Wipe the rims with a damp cloth. Put on cover and ring, tighten hand-tight.
  8. Lower the jars into the scanner and make sure they are covered with at least 1 to 2 inches of water. Put the lid on the scanner and return to the boil. Process glasses for 10 minutes.
  9. Turn off the heating. Take the glasses out of the scanner and place them on a kitchen towel on the countertop. Let cool down for 8 – 24 hours.
  10. Check seals. Remove rings, date, label, and store your maple pear jelly in a cool, dry place.

Remarks

This recipe makes a firm jelly. So if you prefer a softer spread, reduce the calcium water to 3 teaspoons and the pectin to 4 teaspoons.

Keywords: Pears, maple syrup, autumn, canned food, jelly

Maple pear jelly

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